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Tuesday, 30 May 2017

CIVIL R13 4th YEAR COURSE STRUCTURE & SYLLABUS

 













































































































































S.No.IV B. Tech.       I SemesterS.No.IV B. Tech.        II Semester
CodeSubjectTPCCodeSubjectTPC
1 Environmental

Engineering – II
3+1*--31 Design and drawing of Irrigation Structures3+1*--3
2 Estimations, Specifications and Contracts3+1*--32 ELECTIVE – II3+1*--3
3 Construction Technology and Management3+1*--33 ELECTIVE – III3+1*--3
4 Water Resources Engineering–II3+1*--34 ELECTIVE – IV3+1*--3
5 Remote Sensing and GIS Applications3+1*--35 Project Work  9
6 ELECTIVE –I3+1*--3      
7 Environmental

Engineering Lab
--32      
8 GIS & CAD Lab--32      
 Total Credits22 Total Credits21

T- Theory                      P/D – Practical / Drawing             C: Credits             * Tutorial

 

 

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

 

CE701-ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING – II























Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. Outline planning and the design of wastewater collection, conveyance and treatment systems for a community/town/city

  2. Provide knowledge of characterisation of wastewater generated in a community

  3. Impart understanding of treatment of sewage and the need for its treatment.

  4. Summarize the appurtenance in sewerage systems and their necessity

  5. Teach planning, and design of septic tank and imhoff tank and the disposal of the effluent from these low cost treatment systems

  6. Effluent disposal method and realise the importance of regulations in the disposal of effluents in rivers


Course Outcomes:

By the end of successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Plan and design the sewerage systems

  2. Characterisation of Sewage

  3. Select the appropriate appurtenances in the sewerage systems

  4. Selection of suitable treatment flow for sewage treatment

  5. Identify the critical point of pollution in a river for a specific amount of pollutant disposal into the river


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I:

Introduction to sanitation – systems of sanitation – relative merits & demerits – collection and conveyance of waste water – sewerage – classification of sewerage systems- Estimation of sewage flow and storm water drainage – fluctuations – types of sewers - Hydraulics of sewers and storm drains– design of sewers – appurtenances in sewerage – cleaning and ventilation of sewers

 

UNIT – II:

Pumping of wastewater: Pumping stations – location – components– types of pumps and their suitability with regard to wastewaters.

House Plumbing: systems of plumbing-sanitary fittings and other accessories–one pipe and two pipe systems – Design of building drainage

UNIT – III:

Sewage characteristics – Sampling and analysis of wastewater - Physical, Chemical and Biological Examination-Measurement of BOD and COD - BOD equations

Treatment of sewage: Primary treatment-Screens-grit chambers-grease traps–floatation– sedimentation – design of preliminary and primary treatment units.

UNIT – IV:

Secondary treatment: Aerobic and anaerobic treatment process-comparison.

Suspended growth process: Activated Sludge Process, principles, designs, and operational problems, modifications of Activated Sludge Processes, Oxidation ponds, Aerated Lagoons.

Attached Growth Process: Trickling Filters–mechanism of impurities removal- classification–design-operation and maintenance problems. RBCs, Fluidized bed reactors

UNIT V:

Miscellaneous Treatment Methods: Nitrification and Denitrification – Removal of Phosphates –UASB–Membrane reactors-Integrated fixed film reactors. Anaerobic Processes: Septic Tanks and Imhoff tanks- working Principles and Design–disposal of septic tank effluent

UNIT – VI:

Bio-solids (Sludge) management: Characteristics- handling and treatment of sludge-thickening – anaerobic digestion of sludge

Disposal of sewage: methods of disposal – disposal into water bodies-Oxygen Sag Curve-disposal on land- sewage sickness

 

Text Books

  1. Wastewater Engineering Treatment and Reuse by Metcalf & Eddy, Tata McGraw-Hill edition.

  2. Elements of Environmental Engineering by K.N. Duggal, S. Chand & Company Ltd. New Delhi, 2012.

  3. Environmental Engineering by Howard S. Peavy, Donald R. Rowe, Teorge George Tchobanoglus – Mc-Graw-Hill Book Company, New Delhi, 1985

  4. Wastewater Treatment for Pollution Control and Reuse, by Soli. J Arceivala, Sham R Asolekar, Mc-Graw Hill, New Delhi; 3rd Edition


 

References

  1. Environmental Engineering –II: Sewage disposal and Air Pollution Engineering, by Garg, S.K.; Khanna Publishers

  2. Sewage treatment and disposal by Dr. P.N. Modi & Sethi.

  3. Environmental Engineering, by Ruth F.  Weiner and Robin Matthews – 4th Edition Elsevier, 2003

  4. Environmental Engineering by D. Srinivasan, PHI Learning Private Limited, New Delhi, 2011.


***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE702-ESTIMATING, SPECIFICATIONS & CONTRACTS























Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is to enable the students to:

  1. Understand the quantity calculations of different components of the buildings.

  2. Understand the rate analysis of different quantities of the buildings components.

  3. Learn various specifications and components of the buildings.


 

Course Outcomes:

Upon the successful completion of this course:

  1. The student should be able to determine the quantities of different components of buildings.

  2. The student should be in a position to find the cost of various building components.

  3. The student should be capable of finalizing the value of structures.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

General items of work in Building – Standard Units Principles of working out quantities for detailed and abstract estimates –Approximate method of Estimating.

UNIT – II

Rate Analysis – Working out data for various items of work over head and contigent charges.

UNIT-III

Earthwork for roads and canals, Reinforcement bar bending and bar requirement schedules.

UNIT – IV

Contracts – Types of contracts – Contract Documents – Conditions of contract, Valuation of buildings - Standard specifications for different items of building construction.

 

UNIT-V

Detailed Estimation of Buildings using individual wall method.

UNIT -VI

Detailed Estimation of Buildings using centre line method.

FINAL EXAMINATION PATTERN:

The end examination paper should consist of SIX questions from Unit 1 to Unit 4, out of which THREE are to be answered (60% weight-age) & ONE mandatory question (40% weight-age) from Units 5 & 6 is to be answered.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Estimating and Costing’ by B.N. Dutta, UBS publishers, 2000.

  2. ‘Civil Engineering Contracts and Estimates’ by B. S. Patil, Universities Press (India) Pvt. Ltd., Hyd.

  3. ‘Construction Planning and Technology’ by Rajiv Gupta, CBS Publishers &


Distributors Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi.

  1. ‘Estimating and Costing’ by G.S. Birdie.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Standard Schedule of rates and standard data book’ by public works department.

  2. IS 1200 (Parts I to XXV-1974/ Method of Measurement of Building & Civil Engg Works – B.I.S.)

  3. ‘Estimation, Costing and Specifications’ by M. Chakraborthi; Laxmi publications.

  4. National Building Code


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE703-CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT























Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To introduce to  the student the concept of project management including network drawing and monitoring

  2. to introduce the various equipment related to construction like earth moving equipment , trucks and handling equipment , aggregate production and construction equipment and machinery

  3. to introduce the importance of safety in construction projects


Course Outcomes:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. appreciate the importance of construction planning

  2. understand the functioning of various earth moving equipment

  3. know the methods of production of aggregate products and concreting

  4. apply the gained knowledge to project management and construction techniques


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT- I

Construction project management and its relevance – qualities of a project manager – project planning – coordination –scheduling - monitoring – bar charts – milestone charts – critical path method

UNIT -II

Project evaluation and review technique – cost analysis - updating – crashing for optimum cost – crashing for optimum resources – allocation of resources

UNIT- III

Construction equipment – economic considerations – earthwork equipment – Trucks and handling equipment – rear dump trucks – capacities of trucks and handling equipment – calculation of truck production – compaction equipment – types of compaction rollers

 

UNIT -IV

Hoisting and earthwork equipment – hoists – cranes – tractors - bulldozers – graders – scrapers– draglines  - clamshell buckets

UNIT -V

Concreting equipment – crushers – jaw crushers – gyratory crushers – impact crushers – selection of crushing equipment - screening of aggregate – concrete mixers – mixing and placing of concrete – consolidating and finishing

UNIT -VI

Construction methods – earthwork – piling – placing of concrete – form work – fabrication and erection – quality control and safety engineering

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Construction Planning , Equipment and Methods’ by Peurifoy and Schexnayder , Shapira, Tata Mcgrawhill

  2. ‘Construction Project Management Theory and Practice’ by Kumar Neeraj Jha (2011), Pearson.

  3. ‘Construction Technology’ by Subir K. Sarkar and Subhajit Saraswati, Oxford University press


REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Construction Project Management - An Integrated Approach’ by Peter Fewings , Taylor and Francis

  2. ‘Construciton Management Emerging Trends and Technologies’ by Trefor Williams , Cengage learning


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE704-WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING–II























Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course is designed to

  1. introduce the types of irrigation systems

  2. introduce the concepts of planning and design of irrigation systems

  3. discuss the relationships between soil, water and plant and their significance in planning an irrigation system

  4. understand design methods of erodible and non-erodible canals

  5. know the principles of design of hydraulic structures on permeable foundations

  6. know the concepts for analysis and design principles of storage and diversion head works

  7. learn design principles of canal structures


Course Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to

  1. estimate irrigation water requirements

  2. design irrigation canals and canal network

  3. plan an irrigation system

  4. design irrigation canal structures

  5. plan and design diversion head works

  6. analyse stability of gravity and earth dams

  7. design ogee spillways and energy dissipation works


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Irrigation: Necessity and importance, principal crops and crop seasons, types, methods of application, soil-water-plant relationship, soil moisture constants, consumptive use, estimation of consumptive use, crop water requirement, duty and delta, factors affecting duty, depth and frequency of irrigation, irrigation efficiencies, water logging and drainage, standards of quality for irrigation water, crop rotation.

 

UNIT-II

Canals: Classification, design of non-erodible canals - methods of economic section and maximum permissible velocity, economics of canal lining, design of erodible canals -Kennedy’s silt theory and Lacey’s regime theory, balancing depth of cutting.

 

UNIT III

Canal Structures:

Falls: Types and location, design principles of Sarda type fall and straight glacis fall.

Regulators: Head and cross regulators, design principles

Cross Drainage Works: Types, selection, design principles of aqueduct, siphon aqueduct and super passage.

Outlets: types, proportionality, sensitivity and flexibility

River Training: Objectives and approaches

 

UNIT-IV

Diversion Head Works: Types of diversion head works, weirs and barrages, layout of diversion head works, components. Causes and failures of weirs on permeable foundations, Bligh’s creep theory, Khosla’s theory, design of impervious floors for subsurface flow, exit gradient.

 

UNIT-V

Reservoir Planning: Investigations, site selection, zones of storage, yield and storage capacity of reservoir, reservoir sedimentation.

Dams: Types of dams, selection of type of dam, selection of site for a dam.

Gravity dams: Forces acting on a gravity dam, causes of failure of a gravity dam, elementary profile and practical profile of a gravity dam, limiting height of a dam, stability analysis, drainage galleries, grouting.

 

UNIT-VI

Earth Dams: Types, causes of failure, criteria for safe design, seepage, measures for control of seepage-filters, stability analysis-stability of downstream slope during steady seepage and upstream slope during sudden drawdown conditions.

Spillways: Types, design principles of Ogee spillways, types of spillways crest gates. Energy dissipation below spillways-stilling basin and its appurtenances.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Irrigation and Water Power Engineering’ by Punmia B C,P.B.B Lal, A.K. Jain and A.K. Jain (2009), Laxmi Publications Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

  2. ‘Irrigation and Water Resources Engineering’ by Asawa G L (2013), New Age International Publishers

  3. ‘Irrigation Engineering’ by Raghunath H.M (2012), Wiley India.

  4. ‘Irrigation Water Resources and Water Power Engineering’ by Modi P N (2011), Standard Book House, New Delhi


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Water Resources Engineering’ by Mays L.W (2013), Wiley India Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi.

  2. ‘Irrigation Engineering’ by Sharma R.K. and Sharma, T.K (2012), S.Chand & Co Publishers.

  3. ‘Water Resources Engineering’ by Satyanarayana Murthy Challa (2008), New Age International Publishers.


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705-REMOTE SENSING AND GIS APPLICATIONS























Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course is designed to

  1. Introduce the basic principles of Remote Sensing and GIS techniques.

  2. learn various types of sensors and platforms

  3. learn concepts of visual and digital image analyses

  4. understand the principles of spatial analysis

  5. appreciate application of RS and GIS to Civil engineering


Course outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to

  1. Be familiar with ground, air and satellite based sensor platforms.

  2. interpret the aerial photographs and satellite imageries

  3. create and input spatial data for GIS application

  4. apply RS and GIS concepts in water resources engineering


SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

Introduction to remote sensing: Basic concepts of remote sensing, electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic spectrum, interaction with atmosphere, energy interaction with the earth surfaces

characteristics of remote sensing systems

Sensors and platforms: Introduction, types of sensors, airborne remote sensing, spaceborne remote sensing, image data characteristics, digital image data formats-band interleaved by pixel, band interleaved by line, band sequential, IRS, LANDSAT, SPOT

 

UNIT – II

Image analysis: Introduction, elements of visual interpretations, digital image processing- image preprocessing, image enhancement, image classification, supervised classification, unsupervised classification.

 

 

 

UNIT – III

Geographic Information System: Introduction, key components, application areas of GIS, map projections.

Data entry and preparation: spatial data input, raster data models, vector data models.

 

UNIT – IV

Spatial data analysis: Introduction, overlay function-vector overlay operations, raster overlay operations, arithmetic operators, comparison and logical operators, conditional expressions, overlay using a decision table, network analysis-optimal path finding, network allocation, network tracing.

 

UNIT – V

RS and GIS applications General: Land cover and land use, agriculture, forestry, geology, geomorphology, urban applications,

 

UNIT - VI

Application to Hydrology and Water Resources: Flood zoning and mapping, groundwater prospects and potential recharge zones, watershed management.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Bhatta B (2008), ‘Remote sensing and GIS’, Oxford University Press

  2. Lillesand, T.M, R.W. Kiefer and J.W. Chipman (2013) ‘Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation’, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

  3. Schowenger, R. A (2006) ‘Remote Sensing’ Elsevier publishers.

  4. ‘Fundamentals of Remote Sensing’ by George Joseph, Universities Press, 2013.

  5. ‘Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems’ by Demers, M.N, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd, 2013.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Remote Sensing and its Applications’ by Narayan LRA, Universities Press, 2012.

  2. ‘Concepts and  Techniques of Geographical Information System’ by Chor Pang Lo  and A K W Yeung, Prentice Hall (India), 2006

  3. ‘Introduction to Geographic Information Systems’ by Kand Tsung Chang, McGraw Hill Higher Education, 2009.

  4. ‘Basics of Remote sensing & GIS’ by Kumar S, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi, 2005.

  5. ‘Principals of Geographical Information Systems’ by Burrough  P A and R.A. McDonnell, Oxford University Press, 1998.


***

 

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705 (a) - GROUND IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUES


(Elective-I)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To make the student appreciate the need for different ground improvement methods adopted for improving the properties of remoulded and in-situ soils by adopting different techniques such as in situ densification and dewatering methods.

  2. To make the student understand how the reinforced earth technology and soil nailing can obviate the problems posed by the conventional retaining walls.

  3. To enable the students to know how geotextiles and geosynthetics can be used to improve the engineering performance of soils.

  4. To make the student learn the concepts, purpose and effects of grouting.


 

Course Outcomes:

  1. By the end of the course, the student should be able to possess the knowledge of various methods of ground improvement and their suitability to different field situations.

  2. The student should be in a position to design a reinforced earth embankment and check its stability.

  3. The student should know the various functions of Geosynthetics and their applications in Civil Engineering practice.

  4. The student should be able to understand the concepts and applications of grouting.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT- I

In situ densification methods- in situ densification of granular soils- vibration at ground surface and at depth, impact at ground and at depth – in situ densification of cohesive soils – pre loading – vertical drains – sand drains and geo drains – stone columns.

 

UNIT -II

Dewatering – sumps and interceptor ditches – single and multi-stage well points – vacuum well points – horizontal wells – criteria for choice of filler material around drains – electro osmosis

 

UNIT- III

Stabilization of soils – methods of soil stabilization – mechanical – cement – lime – bitumen and polymer stabilization – use of industrial wastes like fly ash and granulated blast furnace slag.

 

UNIT- IV

Reinforce earth – principles – components of reinforced earth – design principles of reinforced earth walls – stability checks – soil nailing.

 

UNIT- V

Geosynthetics – geotextiles – types – functions, properties and applications – geogrids , geomembranes and gabions  - properties and applications.

 

UNIT-VI

Grouting – objectives of grouting – grouts and their applications – methods of grouting – stage of grouting – hydraulic fracturing in soils and rocks – post grout tests

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Ground Improvement Techniques’ by Purushotham Raj, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi.

  2. ‘Ground Improvement Techniques’ by Nihar Ranjan Patro , Vikas Publishing House (p) limited , New Delhi.

  3. ‘An introduction to Soil Reinforcement and Geosynthetics’ by G.L.Siva Kumar Babu, Universities Press.


 

REFERENCE BOOKS:

  1. ‘Ground Improvement’ by MP Moseley , Blackie  Academic and Professional, USA.

  2. ‘Designing with Geosynethetics’  by RM Koerner , Prentice Hall


 

 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705 (b) - AIR POLLUTION AND CONTROL


(Elective-I)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course will address the following:

  1. To know the analysis of air pollutants

  2. To know the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) of various air pollutants

  3. To acquire the design principles of particulate and gaseous control

  4. To learn plume behaviour in different environmental conditions

  5. To learn carbon credits for various day to day activities


Course Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Decide the ambient air quality based the analysis of air pollutants

  2. The design principles of particulate and gaseous control measures for an industry

  3. Judge the plume behaviour in a prevailing environmental condition

  4. Estimate carbon credits for various day to day activities


SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

Air Pollution: Sampling and analysis of air pollutants, conversion of ppm into µg/m3.  Definition of terms related to air pollution and control - secondary pollutants - Indoor air pollution - Climate Change and its impact - Carbon Trade.

 

UNIT-II

Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Air-pollution: Applications in the removal of gases like SOx, NOx, CO and HC - Air-fuel ratio- Computation and Control of products of combustion, Automobile pollution. Odour pollution control, Flares.

 

UNIT – III

Meteorology and Air Pollution: Properties of atmosphere: Heat, Pressure, Wind forces, Moisture and relative Humidity, Lapse Rates - Influence of Terrain and Meteorological phenomena on plume behaviour and Air Quality - Wind rose diagrams, Plume Rise Models

 

UNIT-IV

Ambient Air Quality Management: Monitoring of SPM, SO2; NOx and CO - Stack Monitoring for flue gases - Micro-meteorological monitoring - Weather Station. Emission Standards- Gaussian Model for Plume Dispersion

 

UNIT-V

Air Pollution Control: Control of particulates – Control at Sources, Process Changes, Equipment modifications, Design and operation of control Equipments – Settling Chambers, Cyclone separators –Fabric filters–scrubbers, Electrostatic precipitators

 

UNIT – VI

Air Pollution Control Methods: Control of NOx and SOx emissions – Environmental friendly fuels - In-plant Control Measures, process changes, methods of removal and recycling. Environmental criteria for setting industries and green belts.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Air Pollution by M.N. Rao and H.V.N. Rao – Tata McGraw Hill Company.

  2. Air Pollution and Control by KVSG Murali Krishna, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi


 

REFERENCE:

  1. An Introduction to Air pollution by R.K. Trivedy and P.K. Goel, B.S. Publications.

  2. Air pollution by Wark and Warner - Harper & Row, New York.


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705 (c) - MATRIX METHODS OF STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS


(Elective-I)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. Learn the fundamental concepts of matrix structural mechanics, such as the stiffness method.

  2. The concepts of structural analysis learnt in mechanics of solids and structures course.

  3. Understanding the analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures such as trusses, beams, frames and plane stress problems.

  4. Learn the concepts of the stiffness method and apply it to a variety of structural problems involving trusses, beams, frames, and plane stress.


 

Course Outcomes:

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to

  1. Perform the structural analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures using classical compatibility methods, such as method of consistent deformations, force and equilibrium methods

  2. Perform structural analysis using the stiffness method.

  3. Solve multiple degree of freedom two dimensional problems involving trusses, beams, frames and plane stress.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Introduction of Matrix methods of analysis – Properties of Matrices, singular matrix, Rank of a Matrix and Rank deficiency- Static indeterminacy and Kinematic indeterminacy – Degree of freedom – Structure idealization- stiffness and flexibility methods – Suitability

 

UNIT-II

Generation Element stiffness matrix for truss element, beam element and torsional element- Element force - displacement equations

 

UNIT-III

Stiffness method for beam Elements – Element and global stiffness equation – coordinate transformation and global assembly – structure stiffness matrix equation – analysis of continuous beams

 

UNIT-IV

Stiffness method for plane trusses and Grid elements – development of stiffness matrix – coordinate transformation. Examples of pin jointed trusses and simple grid problems

 

UNIT-V

Additional topics in stiffness methods – Discussion of band width – semi band width – static condensation – sub structuring –Loads between joints-Support displacements

 

UNIT-VI

Space trusses and frames - Member stiffness for space truss and space frame– Transformation matrix from Local to Global – Analysis of simple trusses, beams and frames.

 

TEXT BOOK

  1. ‘Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis’ by Pundit and Gupta

  2. ‘Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis’ by Weaver and Gere, CBS Publishers


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Matrix analysis of structures’ by Robert E Sennet- Prentice Hall- Englewood cliffs-New Jercy

  2. ‘Advanced structural analysis’ by Dr. P. Dayaratnam- Tata McGraw hill publishing company limited.


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705 (d) - URBAN HYDROLOGY


(Elective-I)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course is designed to:

  1. appreciate the impact of urbanization on catchment hydrology

  2. understand the importance of short duration rainfall runoff data for urban hydrology studies.

  3. learn the techniques for peak flow estimation for storm water drainage system design.

  4. understand the concepts in design of various components of urban drainage systems

  5. learn some of the best management practices in urban drainage.

  6. understand the concepts of preparation master urban drainage system


 

Course Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to

  1. develop intensity duration frequency curves for urban drainage systems

  2. develop design storms to size the various components of drainage systems.

  3. apply best management practices to manage urban flooding.

  4. prepare master drainage plan for an urbanized area.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT I

Introduction:  Urbanisation and its effect on water cycle – urban hydrologic cycle – trends in urbanisation – Effect of urbanisation on hydrology

 

UNIT II

Precipitation Analysis: Importance of short duration of rainfall and runoff data, methods of estimation of time of concentration for design of urban drainage systems, Intensity-Duration -Frequency (IDF) curves, design storms for urban drainage systems.

 

UNIT III

Approaches to urban drainage:  Time of concentration, peak flow estimation approaches, rational method, NRCS curve number approach, runoff quantity and quality, wastewater and storm water reuse, major and minor systems.

 

UNIT IV

Elements of drainage systems: Open channel, underground drains, appurtenances, pumping, and source control.

 

UNIT V

Analysis and Management: Stormwater drainage structures, design of stormwater network- Best Management Practices–detention and retention facilities, swales, constructed wetlands, models available for stormwater management.

 

UNIT IV

Master drainage plans: Issues to be concentrated upon – typical urban drainage master plan, interrelation between water resources investigation and urban planning processes, planning objectives, comprehensive planning , use of models in planning

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Manual on Drainage in Urbanised area’ by Geiger W. F., J Marsalek, W. J. Rawls and F. C. Zuidema, (1987 - 2 volumes), UNESCO,

  2. ‘Urban Hydrology’ by Hall M J (1984), Elsevier Applied Science Publisher.

  3. ‘Hydrology – Quantity and Quality Analysis’ by Wanielista M P and Eaglin (1997), Wiley and Sons

  4. ‘Urban Hydrology, Hydraulics and Stormwater Quality: Engineering Applications and Computer Modelling’ by Akan A.O and R.L. Houghtalen (2006), Wiley International.


 

REFERENCES

 

  1.  ‘Stormwater Detention for Drainage’ by Stahre P and Urbonas B (1990), Water Quality and CSO Management, Prentice Hall.

  2.  ‘Urban water cycle processes and interactions’ by Marsalek et al (2006), Publication No. 78, UNESCO, Paris(http://www.bvsde.paho.org/bvsacd/cd63/149460E.pdf)

  3. ‘Frontiers in Urban Water Management – Deadlock or Hope’ by Maksimovic C  and J A Tejada-Guibert (2001), IWA Publishing


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705 (e) - ADVANCED SURVEYING


(Elective-I)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is to enable the students to,

  1. Understand the basics of Geodetic Surveying and triangulation systems.

  2. Understand the hygrographic surveying and prediction of tides.

  3. Understand the Photogrammetric Surveying and Astronomical Surveying.

  4. Understand the importance and applications of total stations and GPS.


Course Outcomes:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. The student should be able to conduct different types of surveys for obtaining better results.

  2. The student should be able to utilize the total stations for getting the required information.

  3. The student should be capable of using the GPS instrument to obtain appropriate information of the objects and their positions.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

Geodetic Surveying: Definition, importance, triangulation system, order of triangulation, size and shape of triangulation, strength of figure criterion, triangulation fieldwork, base line measurement- tape corrections, problems in baseline measurement, measurement of angles.

UNIT –I I

Hydrographic Surveying: Tides-lunar tides, solar tides, spring and neap tides, measurement of tides- shore lines, soundings, sounding equipments, locating soundings by cross rope method and range and time intervals-mean sea level-prediction of tides.

UNIT – III

Photogrammetric Surveying: Basic principles,-photo theodolite, horizontal and vertical angles from terrestrial photographs, elevation of a point by photographic measurement, determination of focal length of the lens, Aerial camera- scale of vertical photograph, scale of tilted photograph, combined effects of tilt and relief, stereoscopic vision, mosaics.

UNIT – IV

Astronomical Surveying:  Spherical Trigonometry, latitude and longitude, solar system, astronomical teams, coordinate systems-altitude, azimuth system, declination, hour angle system, time and astronomical work-sidereal time, apparent solar time, mean solar time, standard time, standard time, application of astronomy in surveying, corrections to astronomical observations.

UNIT – V

Total stations: Importance, measurement of horizontal angles, vertical angles, horizontal distance, slope distance, height of object-remote elevation measurement (REM), remote distance measurement (RDM)-radial and continuous distances for measuring the lengths and sides of the closed circuits, areas and perimeters calculations.

UNIT – VI

Global Positioning System: Principles of GPS, components of GPS, types of GPS and accuracy, applications of GPS, sources of error GPS and limitations.

TEXT 'BOOKS:

  1. ‘Surveying and Levelling’ by R. Subramanian, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.

  2. A text book of Surveying’ by C. Venkatramaiah, University Press, New Delhi.

  3. ‘Surveying Vol. II and Vol. III (Higher Surveying)’ by Dr. B. C. Punmia, Ashok K. Jain and Arun K. Jain, Laxmi Publications Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

  4. ‘Advanced Surveying’ by Satheesh Gopi, R. Sathikumar and N. Madhu, Pearson, New Delhi


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Remote Sensing and its Applications’ by L A R Narayan, Universities Press, New Delhi.

  2. ‘Geographical Information Science’ by Narayan Panigrahi, Universities Press, New Delhi.

  3. ‘Basics of Remote Sensing and GIS’ by Dr. S. Kumar, University Science Press, New Delhi.


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705 (f) - INTERIOR DESIGNS AND DECORATIONS


(Elective-I)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is to enable the students to

  1. Understand the elements and principles of interior designs and decorations.

  2. Learn the importance of art elements in the composition of building spaces.

  3. Learn the new design concepts for developing interiors of buildings.

  4. Learn the application of colors, lightings, furniture in creating beautiful interiors.


 

Course Outcomes:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. understand the importance of interior designs and decorations.

  2. Should realize the use of art elements in the composition of building spaces.

  3. Should learn the new design concepts for developing interiors of buildings.

  4. Learn be able to apply colors, lightings, furniture in creating beautiful interiors.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Development of interior design concepts- importance for interiors in modern buildings, changing trends and salient features, objectives of aesthetic planning - beauty, expressiveness, functionalism, economy- good taste - meaning and importance- developing skill in aesthetics.

UNIT-II

Designs- concepts, meaning, purpose, types - structural and decorative characteristics, forms to function relationship, elements of designs - line and direction, form and shape, size, colour, light, pattern, texture and space - application of elements to form designs.

 

 

UNIT-III

Application of colour harmonies in the interiors and exteriors –effects of light on colour, Illusion of colour, psychology of colour, effect of colour on each other-uses and application of colours- walls, wall finishes, ceilings, roofs, decorative exteriors.

UNIT-IV

Importance of lighting – artificial lighting - light sources, types and uses of light, specific factors in lighting- measurements of lighting, psychological aspects of light, glare, types of glare and prevention– selection of lamps, lighting fixtures, lighting for various areas and activities.

UNIT-V

Principles of design – balance, rhythm, emphasis, harmony, proportion - meaning and application of design concepts in the interior and exterior houses and other commercial buildings- development of design from motifs, elements of art-selection of different art forms, display of art pieces.

UNIT –VI

Interior furnishings- floors, floor coverings, soft furnishings, furniture- selection and arrangement, placement of accessories, home accessories- interior decorations- flower arrangement, floor decorations, interior decoration trends in India.

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Interior Design and Decoration’ by Premavathy Seetharaman and Praveen Pannu, CBS Publishers and distributors, New Delhi, 2005.

  2. ‘Building Construction’ by Rangawala, S.C, Charter publishing house, Anand, 1963.

  3. ‘Interior Design Principles and practice’ by Pratap R.M., Standard publishers distribution, Delhi, 1988.


REFERENCES:

  1. ‘How to see, how to paint it’ by Judy M., Harpen Colling publishers, London, 1994.

  2. ‘Lighting for a beautiful Home’ by Jan Orcharchd, Dunestyle publishing Ltd., U.S.A., 1993.

  3. ‘The Complete Home Decorator’ by Stewart and Sally .W. Annes publishers Ltd.,New York, 1997.


 

***

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE705 (g) -PRESTRESSED CONCRETE


(Elective-I)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. Familiarize Students with concepts of prestressing

  2. Equip student with different systems and devices used in prestressing

  3. Understand the different losses of prestress including short and long term losses

  4. Familiarize students with the analysis and design of prestressed concrete members under flexure, shear and torsion


Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course the student will be able to

  1. Understand the different methods of prestressing

  2. Estimate the effective prestress including the short and long term losses

  3. Analyze and design prestressed concrete beams under flexure and shear

  4. Understand the relevant IS Codal provisions for prestressed concrete


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Basic concepts of Prestressing- Advantages and Applications of Prestressed Concretes, High Strength Concrete- Permissible Stresses, Shrinkage, Creep, Deformation Characteristics, High strength Steel- Types, Strength- Permissible Stresses- Relaxation of Stress, Stress Corrosion- Durability, Fire Resistance, Cover Requirements.

 

UNIT-II

Prestressing Systems- Introduction, Tensioning devices, Pre-tensioning Systems, Post tensioning Systems, Basic Assumptions in Analysis of prestress and design, Analysis of prestress, Resultant Stresses at a section- pressure line- Concepts of load balancing- Stresses in Tendons, Cracking moment.

 

 

 

UNIT-III

Losses of Pre-stressing- Loss of Pre-stress in pre-tensioned and post tensioned members due to various causes -Elastic shortening of concrete, shrinkage of concrete, creep of concrete, Relaxation of steel, slip in anchorage, differential shrinkage- bending of members and frictional losses- Total losses allowed for design

 

UNIT-IV

Design for Flexural resistance- Types of flexural failure – Code procedures- Design of sections for flexure- Control of deflections- Factors influencing- Prediction of short term and long term deflections.

 

UNIT-V

Design for Shear and Torsion- Shear and Principal Stresses- Design of Shear reinforcements- Codal Provisions- Design for Torsion, Design for Combined bending, shear and torsion.
UNIT-IV

Transfer of Prestress in pre tensioned members- Transmission length- Bond stresses- end zone reinforcement- Codal provisions- Anchorage zone stresses in Post tensioned members- Stress distribution in end block- Anchorage Zone reinforcement.

 

TEXT BOOKS

  1. ‘Prestressed Concrete’ by N. Krishna Raju, Tata McGraw hill

  2. ‘Prestressed Concrete’ by S. Ramamrutham


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Prestressed Concrete’ by P. Dayaratnam

  2. ‘Prestressed Concrete’ by T. Y. Lin & Burns, Wiley Publications


 

***

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE707-ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LAB























Lecture :--Internal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :--Semester End Examination :Marks
Practical :3 hrs/weekCredits :2

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course will address the following:

  1. Estimation some important characteristics of water and wastewater in the laboratory

  2. It also gives the significance of the characteristics of the water and wastewater


Course Outcomes:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Estimation some important characteristics of water and wastewater in the laboratory

  2. Draw some conclusion and decide whether the water is potable or not.

  3. Decide whether the water body is polluted or not with reference to the state parameters in the list of experiments

  4. Estimation of the strength of the sewage in terms of BOD and COD


 

SYLLABUS:

List of Experiments

  1. Determination of pH and Electrical Conductivity (Salinity) of Water and Soil.

  2. Determination and estimation of Total Hardness–Calcium & Magnesium.

  3. Determination of Alkalinity/Acidity

  4. Determination of Chlorides in water and soil

  5. Determination and Estimation of total solids, organic solids and inorganic solids and settleable solids by Imhoff Cone.

  6. Determination of Iron.

  7. Determination of Dissolved Oxygen with D.O. Meter & Wrinklers Method and B.O.D.

  8. Determination of N, P, K values in solid waste

  9. Physical parameters – Temperature, Colour, Odour, Turbidity, Taste.

  10. Determination of C.O.D.

  11. Determination of Optimum coagulant dose.

  12. Determination of Chlorine demand.

  13. Presumptive Coliform test.


NOTE: At least 10 of the above experiments are to be conducted.

 

List of Equipments

  • pH meter

  • Turbidity meter

  • Conductivity meter

  • Hot air oven

  • Muffle furnace

  • Dissolved Oxygen meter

  • U–V visible spectrophotometer

  • COD Reflux Apparatus

  • Jar Test Apparatus

  • BOD incubator

  • Autoclave

  • Laminar flow chamber

  • Hazen’s Apparatus


 

Text Books

  1. Standard Methods for Analysis of Water and Waste Water – APHA

  2. Chemical Analysis of Water and Soil by KVSG Murali Krishna, Reem Publications, New Delhi


Reference

  1. Relevant IS Codes.

  2. Chemistry for Environmental Engineering by Sawyer and Mc. Carty.


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- I semester

CE706-GIS & CAD LAB























Lecture :--Internal Assessment :30 Marks
Tutorial :--Semester End Examination :70 Marks
Practical :3 hrs/WeekCredits :2

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course is designed to

  1. Introduce image processing and GIS software

  2. familiarize structural analysis software

  3. understand the process of digitization, creation of thematic map from toposheets and maps

  4. learn to apply GIS software to simple problems in water resources and transportation engineering

  5. learn to analyse 2 D and 3D frame steel tubular truss using structural analysis software

  6. learn to analyse and design retaining wall and simple towers


 

Course outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to

  1. work comfortably on GIS software

  2. digitize and create thematic map and extract important features

  3. develop digital elevation model

  4. use structural analysis software to analyse and design 2D and 3D frames

  5. design and analyse retaining wall and simple towers using CADD software.


 

SYLLABUS:

GIS:

SOFTWARES:

  1. Arc GIS 9.0

  2. ERDAS 8.7

  3. Mapinfo 6.5


Any one or Equivalent.

 

EXCERCISES IN GIS:

  1. Digitization of Map/Toposheet

  2. Creation of thematic maps.

  3. Estimation of features and interpretation

  4. Developing Digital Elevation model

  5. Simple applications of GIS in water Resources Engineering & Transportation Engineering.


 

 

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND DRAWING:

 

SOFTWARE:

  1. STAAD PRO / Equivalent/

  2. STRAAP

  3. STUDDS


 

EXCERCISIES:

  1. 2-D Frame Analysis and Design

  2. Steel Tabular Truss Analysis and Design

  3. 3-D Frame Analysis and Design

  4. Retaining Wall Analysis and Design

  5. Simple Tower Analysis and Design


 

TEXT BOOK:

  1. ‘Concept and Techniques of GIS’ by C.P.L.O. Albert, K.W. Yong, Printice Hall Publishers.


 

***

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester

CE801 - Design and Drawing of Irrigation Structures


 





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

 

 

Course Outcomes:

 

 

SYLLABUS:

 

Design and drawing of

 



    1. Surplus weir

    2. Tank sluice with a tower head

    3. Canal drop-Notch type

    4. Canal regulator

    5. Under tunnel

    6. Syphon aqueduct type III




 

Final Examination pattern: Any two question of the above six designs may be asked out of which the candidated has to answer one question. The duration of the examination is three hours.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

 

  1. Water Resources Engineering – Principles and Practice by C. Satyanarayana Murthy, New age International Publishers.


 

REFERENCE BOOKS:

 

  1. Irrigation Engineering and Hydraulic Structures by S.K. Garg, Standard Book House.

  2. Irrigation and Water Power Engineering by B.C Punmia & Lal, Lakshmi Publications pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.


 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE802 (a) - ENGINEERING WITH GEO-SYNTHETICS


(Elective-II)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The Objectives of the course are to impart to the student

  1. An overview of the evolution of new construction materials in geotechnical engineering and to initiate geosynthetic materials.

  2. Understanding the properties and the testing methods of different types of materials of gosynthetics.

  3. The knowhow of manufacturing methods, uses and applications of geotextiles, geogrids, geomembranes and geocomposites.

  4. The concepts of designing geosynthetics for the functions of separation, reinforcement, stabilization, filtration, drainage and moisture barriers.

  5. Designing criteria of reinforced earth retaining walls, gabions, pond liners, covers for reservoirs, canal liners, landfill liners, caps and closures, dams and embankments.

  6. Additional advantages of geocomposites, geowebs and geocells, and moisture barriers and natural geotextiles etc. for applications to meet various functions.


 

Course Outcomes:

At the successful completion of this course the student will be able to

  1. Realize the need and demand for the use of geosynthetic materials in the field of geotechnical construction works.

  2. Conduct required laboratory and field tests to obtain the properties of different materials of geosynthetics.

  3. Distinguish and describe various manufacturing methods of geotextiles, geogrids, geomembranes and geocomposites.

  4. Understand concepts and could design the geosynthtics for the functions of separation, reinforcement, stabilization, filtration, drainage and moisture barriers.

  5. Design reinforced earth retaining walls, gabions, pond liners, covers for reservoirs, canal liners, landfill liners, caps and closures.

  6. Distinguish survivability requirements of geocomposites and could design geowebs, geocells, and moisture barriers and natural geotextiles etc.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Geosynthetics: Introduction to Geosynthetics – Basic description –Polymeric materials– Uses and Applications. Properties of Geotextiles – Geogrids – Geomembranes – Geocomposites.

UNIT-II

Geotextiles: Design criteria for Separation – Reinforcement – Stabilization – Filtration – Drainage and Moisture barriers.

Geogrids: Designing for Reinforcement – Stabilization – Designing Gabions – Construction methods.

UNIT-III

Use of Geosynthetics in Roads: Geosynthetics in road ways- applications-role of subgrade conditions-desidn criteria-survivability-application in paved roads.

UNIT-IV

Reinforced Earth Retaining Walls: Components - External stability – Internal stability-Design of reinforced earth walls with strip, sheet and grid reinforcement.

UNIT-V

Geomembranes: Pond Liners – Covers for Reservoirs – Canal Liners – Landfill Liners– Caps and closures, moisture barriers.

Geocomposites:  An added advantage – Geocomposites in Separation – Reinforcement – Filtration – Geocomposites as Geowebs and Geocells.

UNIT-VI

Natural Geotextiles: Natural fibres as geotextiles- factors governing the use-jute fibres-coir geotextiles-bamboo/timber-combination of geotextiles.

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Designing with Geosynthetics by Robert M. Koerner, Prantice Hall, Eaglewood Cliffs, NJ 07632.

  2. ‘An Introduction to Soil Reinforcement and Geosynthetics’ by G.L.Sivakumar Babu (2009), Universities Press (India) Pvt. Ltd.

  3. ‘Engineering with Geosynthetics’, by G. Venkatappa Rao and GVS Suryanarayana Raju – Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Limited – New Delhi.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Construction and Geotechnical Engineering using Synthetic Fabries’ by Robert M. Koerner and Josoph P. Welsh. John Willey and Sons, New York.

  2. ‘Foundation Analysis and Design’ by J.E. Bowles McGraw Hill Publications.


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE802 (b) - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT


(Elective-II)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To impart knowledge on different concepts of Environmental Impact Assessment

  2. To know procedures of risk assessment

  3. To learn the EIA methodologies and the criterion for selection of EIA methods

  4. To pre-requisites for ISO 14001 certification

  5. To know the procedures for environmental clearances and audit

  6. To appreciate the importance of stakeholder participation in EIA


 

Course Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Prepare EMP, EIS, and EIA report

  2. Identify the risks and impacts of a project

  3. Selection of an appropriate EIA methodology

  4. Evaluation the EIA report

  5. Estimate the cost benefit ratio of a project

  6. Know the role of stakeholder and public hearing in the preparation of EIA


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

Basic concept of EIA: Elements of EIA-factors affecting EIA-Initial environmental Examination-life cycle analysis preparation of Environmental Base map-Classification of environmental parameters – role of stakeholders in the EIA preparation –stages in EIA

 

 

 

UNIT – II

E I A Methodologies: introduction, Criteria for the selection of EIA Methodology, E I A methods, Ad-hoc methods, matrix methods, Network method Environmental Media Quality Index method, overlay methods, cost/benefit Analysis - EIS and EMP

UNIT-III

Impact of Developmental Activities and Land use: Introduction and Methodology for the assessment of soil and ground water, Delineation of study area, Identification of actives- application of remote sensing and GIS for EIA.

UNIT-IV

Procurement of relevant soil quality, Impact prediction, Assessment of Impact significance, Identification and Incorporation of mitigation measures - E I A with reference to surface water, Air and Biological environment: Methodology for the assessment of Impacts on surface water environment, Generalized approach for assessment of Air pollution Impact.

UNIT – V

Assessment of Impact of development Activities on Vegetation and wildlife, environmental Impact of Deforestation.

Environmental Risk Assessment and Risk management in EIA: Risk assessment and treatment of uncertainty-key stages in performing an Environmental Risk Assessment-advantages of Environmental Risk Assessment

UNIT-VI

EIA notification by Ministry of Environment and Forest (Govt. of India): Provisions in the EIA notification, procedure for environmental clearance, procedure for conducting environmental impact assessment report- evaluation of EIA report. Environmental legislation objectives, evaluation of Audit data and preparation of Audit report. Post Audit activities, Concept of ISO and ISO 14000.

Case studies and preparation of Environmental Impact assessment statement for various Industries.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Environmental Impact Assessment, Canter Larry W., McGraw-Hill education Edi (1996)

  2. Environmental Impact Assessment Methodologies, by Y. Anjaneyulu, B.S. Publication, Sultan Bazar, Hyderabad.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. Environmental Science and Engineering, by J. Glynn and Gary W. Hein Ke – Prentice Hall Publishers

  2. Environmental Science and Engineering, by Suresh K. Dhaneja – S.K.,Katania & Sons Publication., New Delhi.

  3. Environmental Pollution and Control, by Dr H.S. Bhatia – Galgotia Publication (P) Ltd, Delhi


***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE802 (c) - ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING


(Elective-II)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. Familiarize Students with Raft Foundations and Retaining walls

  2. Equip student with concepts of design of different types of RCC water tanks

  3. Understand Concepts of flat slabs

  4. Familiarize different types of Bunkers, Silos and Chimneys

  5. Understand different types of transmission towers


 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course the student will be able to

  1. Design raft foundations and different types of RCC retaining walls

  2. Carryout analysis and design of different types of RCC water tanks

  3. Solve the problems design of RCC Bunkers, Silos and Chimneys

  4. Understand various types of transmission towers and loading on them.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

Analysis and Design of Raft Foundations – Design of RCC Retaining walls: Cantilever and Counter fort

 

UNIT – II

Analysis and Design of RCC Water Tanks, Circular and Rectangular types- Intze tank including staging.

 

UNIT – III

Analysis and Design of Flat Slabs- Direct Design and Equivalent Frame Methods- Check for Punching shear

 

 

UNIT - IV

Analysis and Design of Bunkers and Silos- Concepts of Loading

 

UNIT-V

Analysis and Design of Chimney, Concepts of loading

 

UNIT-VI

Introduction to Transmission Towers- Principles and procedures

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Reinforced Concrete Structures’ Vol-2 by B. C. Punmia, Ashok Kumar Jain and Arun Kumar Jain, Laxmi, publications Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi

  2. ‘Reinforced Concrete Structures’ by N. Subrahmanian, Oxford Publishers

  3. ‘Design Drawing of Concrete and Steel Structures’ by N. Krishna Raju University Press 2005.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Essentials of Bridge Engineering’ by D. Johnson Victor, Oxford and IBM publication Co., Pvt. Ltd.

  2. ‘Reinforced concrete design’ by S. U, Pillai and D. Menon, Tata Mc.Grawhill Publishing Company


Codes: Relevant IS: codes.

 

***

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE802 (d) - GROUND WATER DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT


(Elective-II)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course is designed to

  1. appreciate groundwater as an important natural resource.

  2. understand flow towards wells in confined and unconfined aquifers.

  3. understand the principles involved in design and construction of wells.

  4. create awareness on improving the groundwater potential using various recharge techniques.

  5. know the importance of saline water intrusion in coastal aquifers and its control measures.

  6. appreciate various geophysical approaches for groundwater exploration.

  7. learn groundwater management using advanced tools.


Course Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to

  1. estimate aquifer parameters and yield of wells

  2. analyse radial flow towards wells in confined and unconfined aquifers.

  3. design wells and understand the construction practices.

  4. interpret geophysical exploration data for scientific source finding of aquifers.

  5. determine the process of artificial recharge for increasing groundwater potential.

  6. take effective measures for controlling saline water intrusion.

  7. apply appropriate measures for groundwater management.


SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

Introduction

Groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, groundwater occurrence, aquifer parameters and their determination, general groundwater flow equation.

Well Hydraulics

Steady radial flow and unsteady radial flow to a well in confined and unconfined aquifers, Theis solution, Jocob and Chow’s methods, Leaky aquifers.

UNIT – II

Well Design

Water well design-well diameter, well depth, well screen-screen length, slot size, screen diameter and screen selection, design of collector wells, infiltration gallery

UNIT III

Well Construction and Development

Water wells, drilling methods-rotary drilling, percussion drilling, well construction-installation of well screens-pull-back method, open- hole, bail- down and wash-down methods, well development-mechanical surging using compressed air, high velocity jetting of water, over pumping and back washing, well completion, well disinfection, well maintenance.

UNIT IV

Artificial Recharge

Concept of artificial recharge of groundwater, recharge methods-basin, stream-channel, ditch and furrow, flooding and recharge well methods, recharge mounds and induced recharge

 

Saline Water Intrusion

Occurrence of saline water intrusion, Ghyben- Herzberg relation, Shape of interface, control of saline water intrusion.

UNIT – V

Geophysics

Surface methods of exploration of groundwater – Electrical resistivity and Seismic refraction methods, Sub-surface methods – Geophysical logging and resistivity logging. Aerial Photogrammetry applications

 

UNIT – VI

Groundwater Modelling and Management

Basic principles of groundwater modelling- Analog models-viscous fluid models and membrane models, digital models-Finite difference and finite element models, Concepts of groundwater management, basin management by conjunctive use-case studies.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Groundwater’ by Raghunath H M, New Age International Publishers, 2005.

  2. ‘Groundwater Hydrology’ by Todd D.K., Wiley India Pvt Ltd., 2014.

  3. ‘Groundwater Hydrology’ by Todd D K and L W Mays, CBS Publications, 2005.


 

 

 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Groundwater Assessment and Management’ by Karanth K R, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co., 1987.

  2. ‘Groundwater Hydrology’ by Bouwer H, McGraw Hill Book Company, 1978.

  3. ‘Groundwater Systems Planning and Management’ by Willis R and W.W.G. Yeh, Prentice Hall Inc., 1986.

  4. ‘Groundwater Resources Evaluation’ by Walton W C, McGraw Hill Book Company, 1978.


***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE802 (e) - TRAFFIC ENGINEERING


(Elective-II)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To know various components and characteristics of traffic.

  2. To know various traffic control devices and principles of highway safety.

  3. To understand the detrimental effects of traffic on environment

  4. To know highway capacity and level of service concepts.

  5. To learn about intelligent vehicle highway systems.


Course Outcomes:

At the end of course, Student can

  1. Determine traffic speed, volume, travel time and density.

  2. Design traffic signals

  3. Determine highway capacity


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT- I

Components Of The Traffic System: Human-Vehicle–Environment System; characteristics of Road users, Vehicles, Highways and their classification; Traffic Studies: Inventories; Volume studies; Speed, Travel time and Delay studies; Intersection studies; Pedestrian studies; Parking studies; Accident studies.

UNIT- II

Traffic Characteristics: Microscopic and macroscopic flow characteristics: Time headways; Temporal, spatial and model flow patterns; Interrupted and Uninterrupted traffic. Microscopic and macroscopic speed characteristics: Vehicular speed Trajectories; Speed characteristics – Mathematical distribution; Speed and travel time variations; Travel time and delay studies. Microscopic and Macroscopic density characteristics: Distance headway characteristics; Car-following theories; Density measurement techniques; Density contour maps

 

UNIT- III

Traffic Control Devices & Highway Safety: Traffic signs & Markings; Signal Warrants; Signal phasing and Development of phase plans; Fixed and Vehicle activated signals; Webster method; ARRB method; Drew’s Method; IRC method; Signal coordination; Area Traffic control. Accident characteristics – Road – Driver – Vehicle; Accident recording and Analysis; Highway Safety Improvement Program; Safety Audit.

UNIT- IV

Environmental Considerations: Air pollution: Kinds of pollutants; Air pollution standards; Measures of air quality; modelling and control. Noise pollution: Measurement of sound levels; Acceptable limits, Prediction of noise levels, Traffic noise control.

UNIT- V

Highway Capacity And Level Of Service:  Capacity and level of service; Factors affecting Capacity and LOS; Capacity of Rural Highways, Capacity of Urban Roads; HCM and IRC standards.

UNIT- VI

Intelligent Vehicle – Highway Systems: Traffic surveillance and monitoring; IVHS programs, Role of IVHS, IVHS categories, Benefits and Costs of IVHS

 

TEXT BOOKS

  1. ‘Traffic Engineering: Theory and Practice’ by Pignataro LJ., Prentice hall, Inc

  2. ‘Traffic and Transport planning’ by Kadiyali L.R., Khanna Publishers


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Traffic Engineering Hand Book’ by Institute of Transportation Engineers, 4 Ed., Prentice Hall

  2. ‘Traffic Engineering’ by Mc Shane, WR and RP Roess, Prentice Hall

  3. ‘Highway Traffic analysis and design’ by Salter RJ and NB Hounsell, 3rd ed., Macmillan

  4. ‘Traffic Planning and Engineering’ by Hobbs FD., Pergamon press

  5. ‘Traffic flow fundamentals’ by May, AD., Prentice Hall


***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE802 (f) - INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT


(Elective-II)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

Infrastructure Management focuses on the processes necessary for the planning and development of new infrastructure, and on maintaining and operating mature infrastructure for sustainability. A wide variety of management topics are covered, such as infrastructure planning, infrastructure economics, infrastructure management systems, optimal maintenance management, reliability of infrastructure systems, asset valuation and utilization, and infrastructure planning under risk and uncertainty.

Course Outcomes:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Performance Measures & Deterioration Modeling: Defining performance, Common characteristics of infrastructures, Condition assessment and condition indices; Different types of deterioration models; Empirical and Mechanistic models, Markov and Semi-Markov models, Risk-based deterioration modeling

UNIT-II

PRIORITIZATION AND MAINTENANCE PLANNING & POLICY: Needs Analysis, Ranking by single criteria, Ranking by fixed and variable trigger points, Single/multiple-year prioritization; Different types of maintenance planning, Maintenance policy

UNIT-III

INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMICS: Costs and benefits, Trade-off Analysis, Cost-effectiveness technique and Budget allocation

 

UNIT-IV

OPTIMIZATION: Objective functions, decision variables and constraints, Optimization techniques, Optimal maintenance planning

UNIT-V

Asset Management System: Management System, Components of Asset Management System

UNIT-VI

Tools and Technology: Destructive Testing, Nondestructive Testing, Database Management System for Inventory Data Control, Other Information Technology

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Infrastructure Management’ by Hudson, Haas and Uddin, McGraw-Hill, 1997.

  2. ‘Infrastructure Engineering and Management’ Grigg, N., John Wiley & Sons, 1998.

  3. ‘Infrastructure Condition: Art, Science and Practice’ by Saito, M., ASCE, 1997.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Markov Chains’ by Norris, J. R., Cambridge University Press, 1997.

  2. ‘Pavement Management for Airports, Roads and Parking Lots’ by Kluwer, Shahin M, Kluwer Academic Publisher, 1994.


 

***

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE803 (a) - ADVANCED FOUNDATION ENGINEERING


(Elective-III)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To enable the student to appreciate how Meyerhof’s general bearing capacity equations are important over Terzaghi’s bearing capacity equation.

  2. To teach the student special methods of computation of settlements and the corrections to be applied to settlements.

  3. To enable the student to understand the advanced concepts of design of pile foundations.

  4. To teach the student the problems posed by expansive soils and the foundation practices appropriate to expansive soils.

  5. To enable the student to learn the difference between isolated and combined footings, the determination of bearing capacity of mats and proportioning of footings.


 

Course Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, student will be able to

  1. Compute the safe bearing capacity of footings subjected to vertical and inclined loads.

  2. understand the advanced methods of settlement computations and proportion foundation footings.

  3. appreciate the methods of computing the pull-out capacity and negative skin friction of piles and compute the settlements of pile groups in clays.

  4. appreciate the problems posed by expansive soils and the different foundation practices devised.

  5. appreciate the difference between isolated footings and combined footings and mat foundations.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Bearing capacity of Foundations using general bearing capacity equation – Meyerhof’s, Brinch Hansen’s and Vesic’s methods

UNIT-II

Settlement analysis: Immediate settlement of footings resting on granular soils – Schmertmann & Hartman method – De Beer and Martens method - Immediate settlement in clays – Janbu’s method – correction for consolidation settlement using Skempton and Bjerrum’s method – Correction for construction period

UNIT-III

Mat foundations – Purpose and types of isolated and combined footings – Mats/ Rafts – Proportioning of footings – Ultimate bearing capacity of mat foundations – allowable bearing capacity of mats founded in clays and granular soils – compensated rafts.

UNIT-IV

Earth-retaining structures – cantilever sheet piles – anchored bulkheads – fixed and free earth support methods – design of anchors – braced excavations – function of different components – forces in ties – stability against bottom heave.

UNIT-V

Pile foundations – single pile versus group of piles – load-carrying capacity of pile groups – negative skin friction (NSF) -settlement of pile groups in sands and clays – laterally loaded piles in granular soils – Reese and Matlock method – laterally loaded piles in cohesive soils – Davisson and Gill method – Broms’ analysis.

UNIT-VI

Foundations in expansive soils – definitions of swell potential and swelling pressure – determination of free swell index – factors affecting swell potential and swelling pressure – foundation practices – sand cushion method – CNS layer - drilled piers and belled piers – under-reamed piles – moisture control methods.

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Basic and applied soil mechanics’ by Gopal Ranjan and ASR Rao, New Age Publishers

  2. ‘Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering’ by VNS Murthy, CBS Publishers

  3. ‘Principles of Foundation Engineering’ by BM Das, Thomson Brooks/Cole


REFERENCE BOOKS:

  1. ‘Foundation Analysis and Design’ by JE Bowles, John Wiley

  2. ‘Foundation Design’ by WC Teng, Prentice Hall Publishers


 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE803 (b) - SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT


(Elective-III)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To impart the knowledge the methods of collection and optimization of collection routing of municipal solid waste

  2. To acquire the principles of treatment of municipal solid waste

  3. To know the impact of solid waste on the health of the living beings

  4. To learn the criterion for selection of landfill and its design

  5. to plan the methods of processing such as composting the municipal organic waste


Course Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Design the collection systems of solid waste of a town

  2. Design treatment of municipal solid waste and landfill

  3. To know the criteria for selection of landfill

  4. To characterise the solid waste and design a composting facility


SYLLABUS:

UNIT- I

Introduction to Solid Waste Management: Goals and objectives of solid waste management, Classification of Solid Waste - Factors Influencing generation of solid waste - sampling and characterization –Future changes in waste composition, major legislation, monitoring responsibilities.

 

UNIT- II

Basic Elements in Solid Waste Management: Elements and their inter relationship – principles of solid waste management- onsite handling, storage and processing of solid waste

Collection of Solid Waste: Type and methods of waste collection systems, analysis of collection system - optimization of collection routes– alternative techniques for collection system.

 

UNIT- III

Transfer and Transport: Need for transfer operation, compaction of solid waste - transport means and methods, transfer station types and design requirements.

UNIT- IV

Separation and Transformation of Solid Waste: unit operations used for separation and transformation: shredding - materials separation and recovery, source reduction and waste minimization

 

UNIT- V

Processing and Treatment: Processing of solid waste - Waste transformation through combustion and composting, anaerobic methods for materials recovery and treatment – Energy recovery – biogas generation and cleaning– Incinerators.

 

UNIT- VI

Disposal of Solid Waste: Methods of Disposal, Landfills: Site selection, design and operation, drainage and leachate collection systems –designated waste landfill remediation.

 

TEXT BOOKS

  1. George Techobanoglous “Integrated Solid Waste Management”, McGraw Hill Publication, 1993


REFERENCES

  1. Vesilind, P.A., Worrell, W., Reinhart, D. “Solid Waste Engineering”, Cenage learning, New Delhi, 2004

  2. Charles A. Wentz; “”Hazardous Waste Management”, McGraw Hill Publication, 1995.


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE803 (c) - EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT DESIGN


(Elective-III)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. Familiarize Students with Engineering Seismology

  2. Equip student with concepts of Structural Dynamics

  3. Understand Concepts of Seismic Design

  4. Familiarize with Design philosophies for Seismic loading

  5. Familiarize students with various IS codal provisions for ductile design and detailing


 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course the student will be able to

  1. Explain fundamentals of Engineering Seismology

  2. Acquaint with the principles Structural dynamics

  3. Solve SDOF Systems and suggest ductile design

  4. Compute equivalent lateral seismic loads and carryout a seismic design as per IS codal provisions


SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Engineering seismology – rebound theory – plate tectonics – seismic waves -  Earthquake size and various scales – local site effects – Indian seismicity – seismic zones of India – theory of vibrations – near ground and far ground rotation and their effects.

 

UNIT-II

Introduction to Structural Dynamics:  Fundamental objective of Dynamic analysis – Types of prescribed loadings – Formulation of the Equations of Motion– Elements of a Vibratory system – Degrees of Freedom - Oscillatory motion – Simple Harmonic Motion – Free Vibrations of Single Degree of Freedom (SDOF) systems – Undamped and Damped – Critical damping – Logarithmic decrement – Forced vibrations of SDOF systems – Harmonic excitation – Dynamic magnification factor

 

UNIT-III

Seismic design concepts – EQ load on simple building – load path – floor and roof diaphragms – seismic resistant building architecture – plan configuration – vertical configuration – pounding effects – mass and stiffness irregularities – torsion in structural system- Provision of seismic code (IS 1893 & 13920) – Building system – frames – shear wall – braced frames – layout design of Moment Resisting Frames (MRF) – ductility of MRF – Infill wall – Non- structural elements.

UNIT-IV

Calculation of equivalent lateral force- Design Base Shear- Storey Shear, Estimation of Natural period of Structure, Computation of Response acceleration Coefficient- Zone factor- Seismic weight- Response reduction factors- Seismic Coefficient Method

 

UNIT-V

Design and ductile detailing of Beams and columns of frames -Concept of strong column weak beams, Ductility criteria for earthquake resistant design, Ductile detailing of flexural members as per IS 13920- Longitudinal reinforcement, Shear reinforcement, Anchorage of reinforcement- Development length, Lap Splices.

 

UNIT-VI

Seismic Analysis and design of simple 2-storied RC Building frame – Equivalent static lateral force method and response spectrum method

TEXT BOOK

  1. ‘Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures’ - Pankaj Agarwal and Manish ShriKhande, Prentice – Hall of India, 2007, New Delhi.

  2. ‘Earthquake Resistant Design of Building Structures’ by Vinod Hosur, Wiley India Ltd.

  3. ‘Reinforced Concrete Design’ by A. K. Jain,


 

REFERENCES

  1. ‘Introduction to the Theory of Seismology’ by Bullen K.E., Great Britain at the University Printing houses, Cambridge University Press 1996.

  2. Relevant code of practices.


***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE803 (d) - WATERSHED MANAGEMENT


(Elective-III)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course is designed to:

  1. introduce the concept of watershed management

  2. understand the watershed characteristics

  3. learn the principles of soil erosion and measures to control erosion

  4. appreciate various water harvesting techniques.

  5. learn land management practices for various land use/land cover.

  6. introduce concepts of watershed modelling.


 

Course outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to

  1. calculate watershed parameters and analyse watershed characteristics to take appropriate management action.

  2. quantify soil erosion and design control measures

  3. apply land grading techniques for proper land management

  4. suggest suitable harvesting techniques for better watershed management

  5. apply appropriate models for watershed management.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Introduction: Concept of watershed development, objectives of watershed development, need for watershed development, Integrated and multidisciplinary approach for watershed management.

 

UNIT-II

Characteristics of Watersheds: Size, shape, physiography, slope, climate, drainage, land use, vegetation, geology and soils, hydrology and hydrogeology, socio-economic characteristics, basic data on watersheds.

 

 

UNIT-III

Principles of Erosion: Types and causes of erosion, factors affecting erosion,  estimation of soil loss due to erosion- Universal soil loss equation.

 

Measures to Control Erosion: Contour techniques, ploughing, furrowing, trenching, bunding, terracing, gully control, check dams , rock-fill dams, brushwood dam, Gabion.

 

UNIT-IV

Water Harvesting: Techniques of rain water harvesting- rain water harvesting from roof top, surface flow harvesting, subsurface flow harvesting, stop dams, farm ponds and dugout ponds, percolation tanks.

 

UNIT-V

Land Management: Land use and Land capability classification, management of forest, agricultural, grassland and wild land, land grading operation, Reclamation of saline and alkaline soils.

 

UNIT-VI

Watershed Modelling: Data of watershed for modelling, application and comparison of watershed models, model calibration and validation, advances of watershed models

                                                                   

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Watershed Management’ by Das MM and M.D Saikia, PHI Learning Pvt Ltd, 2013.

  2. ‘Land and Water Management’ by Murthy.VVN, Kalyani Publications, 2007.

  3. ‘Watershed Management’ by Murthy J V S, New Age International Publishers, 2006.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Water Resource Engineering’ by Wurbs R A and James R A, Prentice Hall Publishers, 2002.

  2. ‘Watershed Hydrology’ by Black P E, Prentice Hall, 1996.


 

***

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE803 (e) - PAVEMENT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN


(Elective-III)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To know various factors affecting pavement design

  2. To know various concepts for the stresses in pavements.

  3. To understand material characterisation and mix design concepts.

  4. To acquire design principles of flexible and rigid pavements.

  5. To acquire design principles of shoulders, overlays and drainage.


Course Outcomes:

At the end of course, Student can

  1. Design flexible and rigid pavements using various methods

  2. Design shoulders, overlays and drainage.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Factors Affecting Pavement Design: Variables Considered in Pavement Design, Types of Pavements, Functions of Individual Layers, Classification of Axle Types of Rigid Chassis and Articulated Commercial Vehicles, Legal Axle and Gross Weights on Single and Multiple Units, Tire Pressure, Contact Pressure, EAL and ESWL Concepts, Traffic Analysis: ADT, AADT, Truck Factor, Growth Factor, Lane, Directional Distributions & Vehicle Damage Factors, Effect of Transient & Moving Loads.

UNIT-II

Stresses In Pavements: Vehicle-Pavement Interaction: Transient, Random & Damping Vibrations, Steady State of Vibration, Experiments on Vibration, Stress Inducing Factors in Flexible and Rigid pavements; Stress in Flexible Pavements: Visco-Elastic Theory and Assumptions, Layered Systems Concepts, Stress Solutions for One, Two and Three Layered Systems, Fundamental Design Concepts; Stresses in Rigid Pavements: Westergaard’s Theory and Assumptions, Stresses due to Curling, Stresses and Deflections due to Loading, Frictional Stresses, Stresses in Dowel Bars & Tie Bars, Introduction to DAMA, KENLAYER & KENSLABS Programs

UNIT-III

Material Characterisation & Mix Design Concepts: CBR and Modulus of Subgrade Reaction of Soil, Mineral aggregates – Blending of aggregates, binders, polymer and rubber modified bitumen, Resilient, Diametral Resilient and Complex (Dynamic) Moduli of Bituminous Mixes, Permanent Deformation  Parameters and other Properties, Effects and Methods of Stabilisation and Use of Geo Synthetics; Marshall’s and Hveem’s Methods of Bituminous Concrete Mix Design, Field Implications of Stability and Flow Values, Introduction to Super Pave Mix Design, IRC Cement Concrete Mix Design

 

UNIT-IV

Design of Flexible Pavements: Flexible Pavement Design Concepts, Asphalt Institute’s Methods with HMA and other Base Combinations, AASHTO, Road Note No 29 & IRC Methods, Design of Runways & Taxiways, Design of Low Volume Rural Roads

UNIT-V

Design Of Rigid Pavements: Calibrated Mechanistic Design Process, PCA, AASHTO & IRC Specifications, Introduction to Prestressed and Continuously Reinforced Cement Concrete Pavement Design, Rigid Pavement Design for Low Volume Rural Roads.

UNIT-VI

Design Of Shoulders, Overlays & Drainage: Shoulder Design Considerations, Traffic Prediction, Parking, Regular & Encroaching Traffic, Thickness Design Specifications for Flexible & Rigid Shoulders; Types & Design of Overlays: AI’s Principal Component Analysis & IRC Methods of Overlay Design, Importance of Profile Correction Course; Pavement Drainage Concepts, Drainage Related Failures, Inflow-Outflow Concepts, Condition of Continuity, Surface and Sub Surface Drainage Design Specifications

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Pavement Analysis and Design’ by Yang H. Huang, Pearson Education, Second Edition.

  2. ‘Principles of Pavement Design’ by Yoder.J. & Witczat Mathew, W. John Wiley & Sons Inc

  3. ‘Pavement Design’ by Srinivasa Kumar R, Universities Press, Hyderabad


REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Design of Functional Pavements’ by Nai C. Yang, McGraw Hill Publications

  2. ‘Concrete Pavements’ by AF Stock,  Elsevier, Applied Science Publishers

  3. ‘Pavement and Surfacings for Highway & Airports’ by Micheal Sargious, Applied Science Publishers Limited.

  4. ‘Dynamics of Pavement Structures’ by G. Martineek, Chapmen & Hall Inc

  5. ‘Principles of Transportation Engineering’ by Patha Chakroborty and Animesh Das, PHI Learning Private Limited, Delhi


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE803 (f) - GREEN BUILDINGS


(Elective-III)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

 

Course Outcomes:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Green Buildings: Definition of Green Buildings, typical features of green buildings, benefits of Green Buildings- Sustainable site selection and planning of buildings to maximize comfort, day lighting, ventilation, planning for storm water drainage

UNIT- II

Environmentally friendly building materials and technologies: Natural Materials like bamboo, timber, rammed earth, stabilized mud blocks, hollow blocks, lime & lime-pozzolana cements, materials from agro and industrial waste, ferro-cement and ferro-concrete, alternative roofing systems, various paints reducing the heat gain of the building, etc.

UNIT - III

Energy and resource conservation: Need for energy conservation, various forms of energy used in buildings,  embodied energy of materials, energy used in transportation and construction processes- water conservation systems in buildings-water harvesting in buildings – waste to energy management in residential complexes or gated communities

UNIT- IV

Use of renewable energy resources: Wind and Solar Energy Harvesting, potential of solar energy in India and world, construction and operation of various solar appliances, success case studies of fully solar energy based buildings in India.

 

UNIT- V

Climate Design:  Local climatic conditions – temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction-impact of climate change on built environment -comforts: the desirable conditions – Principles of thermal design - means of thermal –light and lighting-building acoustics- energy efficient lighting, Ventilation and air quality requirement, various techniques for passive cooling, garden roofs, case studies for passive cooling and thermal comfort

UNIT- VI

Green Building Rating Systems: Introduction to Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED), Green Rating systems for Integrated Habitat Assessment - Modular wastewater treatment systems for built environment -Building automation and building management systems

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Alternative building materials and technologies’ by K.S. Jagadish, B.V. Venkatarama Reddy and K.S. Nanjunda Rao

  2. ‘Non-Conventional Energy Resources’ by G. D. Rai, Khanna Publishers


REFERENCES:

 

 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE804 (a) - SOIL DYNAMICS AND MACHINE FOUNDATIONS


(Elective-IV)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The basic course in soil mechanics/geotechnical engineering generally introduces the fundamental concepts, principles and applications of soil as engineering material with properties under static loading.

This course on ‘Soil Dynamics’ discusses

  1. About the fundamentals of vibrations

  2. about the behaviour and properties/response of soil as a material which is subjected to various types of dynamic or cyclic time-dependent loadings.

  3. the design and analysis for machine foundations come along with this course to consider the dynamic properties of both soil and foundation as combined mass. Behaviour of various geotechnical structures such as shallow and deep foundations, retaining structures due to various types of time-dependent dynamic loading are discussed here along with the reference to design code provisions.

  4. Phenomena like liquefaction and lateral spreading of soil are also discussed.

  5. Discusses about the laboratory and filed tests to compute the dynamic soil properties of the soil mass.


 

Course Outcomes:

On successful completion of these course, the student able to

  1. Use theory of vibrations to find the behavior of soil under dynamic loading

  2. Design machine foundations under different loads and soil conditions

  3. Understand the liquefaction phenomina

  4. Conduct various laboratory and filed tests to determine the dynamic soil prosperities and its interpretation.

  5. Design vibration isolators under any vibratory machines.


 

 

 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Introduction: Types of motion- SHM- Fundamental definitions- SDOF systems- Free and forced vibration with and without damping - Constant  force and rotating mass type excitation –Types of damping-Equivalent stiffness of springs in series and parallel. –  Resonance and its effect - magnification-logarithmic decrement –Transmissibility.

UNIT-II

Theories of Vibration Analysis- EHS Theory and lumped parameter model- Different modes of vibration- Natural frequency of foundation soil system – Barkan and IS methods – Pressure bulb concept – Reisner Theory – Limitations of Reisner theory – Sung’s solutions -- Pauw’s Analogy – Heigh’s Theory.

UNIT-III

Dynamic properties of soils, Determination of E, G and Poisons ratio from field and laboratory tests, recommendations of Indian codes- Stress waves in bounded elastic medium- Use of wave theory in the determination of elastic properties, Elastic coefficients of soils and their determination- damping factor from free and forced vibration tests.– Block vibration test – Determination of Damping factor.

UNIT-IV

Types of machine foundations – general requirements design – criteria for machine foundations, permissible amplitudes and bearing pressure

Design data, design criteria, IS code provisions for the design foundations of reciprocating machines.

UNIT-V

Design data, design criteria, IS code provisions for the design foundations of Impact type of machines.

UNIT-VI

Vibration Isolation: Transmissibility, Principles of isolation- Methods of isolation- Vibration isolators- Types and their characterizes

Special Topics:  Liquefaction of soils, CSR, CRR, Factor of safety against liquefaction - Dynamic bearing capacity, Earth retaining structures under dynamic loads

TEXT BOOK:

  1. ‘Vibrations of Soils and Foundations’ by Richart Hall and Woods


 

 

 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Vibration Analysis and Foundation Dynamics’ by NSV Kameswara Rao, Wheeler  Publishing, New Delhi.

  2. ‘Foundations of Machines- Analysis and Design’ by Prakash and Puri

  3. ‘Analysis and design of Foundations for Vibrations’ by P J Moore

  4. ‘Fundamentals of Soil Dynamics’ by B M Das

  5. ‘Dynamics of bases and Foundations’ by D D Barkar


***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE804 (b) - ENVIRONMENTAL AND INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE


(Elective-IV)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To   provide   with information   regarding   Occupational health, Hygiene, workplace safety

  2. To make aware of regulations, codes of practice in industrial hygiene

  3. To impart basic knowledge on industrial fatigue and ergonomics

  4. To know the basic right of an employee on safety aspects


Course Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:

  1. Identify aspects related to occupational health, Hygiene, workplace safety in an industry

  2. Know the regulations, codes of practice available with reference to industrial hygiene

  3. Enlist the common points related to ergonomics

  4. Know the safety equipment and the basic right of an employee on safety aspects


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT- I

Introduction: Need for developing Environment, Health and Safety systems in work places. Status and relationship of Acts, Regulations and Codes of Practice. Role of trade union safety representatives

 

UNIT- II

Occupational Health and Hygiene: Definition of the term occupational health and hygiene. Categories of health hazards. Exposure pathways and human responses to hazardous and toxic substances. Advantages and limitations of environmental monitoring and occupational exposure limits. Hierarchy of control measures for occupational health risks. Control methods and reduction strategies for noise, radiation and excessive stress. OHSAS

 

 

 

UNIT- III

Workplace Safety and Safety Systems: Features of the satisfactory design of work premises, ventilation. Safe installation and use of electrical supplies. Fire safety and first aid provision. Significance of human factors in the establishment and effectiveness of safe systems. Safe systems of work for manual handling operations. Control methods to eliminate or reduce the risks arising from the use of work equipment. Requirements for the safe use of display screen equipment. Procedures and precautionary measures necessary when handling hazardous substances- Contingency arrangements for events of serious and imminent danger

 

UNIT -IV

Techniques of Environmental Safety:  Methods of effective implementation and review of health & safety policies.  Functions and techniques of risk assessment, Investigation of accidents- Principles of quality management systems in health and safety management

 

UNIT- V

Industrial Fatigue and Ergonomics:

Fatigue: Types of fatigue - circadian rhythms- sleep cycle-sleep debt-effects of fatigue-factors contributing to fatigue- mitigation of fatigue

Ergonomics: definition-boundaries of ergonomics- objectives and principles of ergonomics-ergonomics relation with health and safety-ergonomics problems in work place-ergonomics improvements-identification of poor posture and risks.

 

UNIT- VI

Education and Training: Relationship between quality manuals, safety policies and written risk assessments. Records and other documentation required by an organisation for health and safety. Principles and methods of effective training- Feedback and evaluation mechanism.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Environmental and Health and Safety Management’ by Nicholas P. Cheremisinoff and Madelyn L. Graffia, William Andrew Inc. NY, 1995

  2. ‘The Facility Manager's Guide to Environmental Health and Safety’ by Brian Gallant, Government Inst Publ., 2007.

  3. ‘Effective Environmental, Health, and Safety Management Using the Team Approach’ by Bill Taylor, Culinary and Hospitality Industry Publications Services 2005


***

 

 

 

 

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE804 (c) - REPAIR AND REHABILITATION OF STRUCTURES


(Elective-IV)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. Familiarize Students with deterioration of concrete in structures

  2. Equip student with concepts of NDT and evaluation

  3. Understand failures and causes for failures in structures

  4. Familiarize different materials and techniques for repairs

  5. Understand procedure to carryout Physical evaluation of buildings and prepare report


Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course the student will be able to

  1. Explain deterioration of concrete in structures

  2. Carryout analysis using NDT and evaluate structures

  3. Assess failures and causes of failures in structures

  4. Carryout Physical evaluation and submit report on condition of the structure


SYLLABUS:

UNIT - I

Deterioration of concrete in structures: Physical processes of deterioration like Freezing and Thawing,  Wetting and Drying, Abrasion, Erosion, Pitting, Chemical processes like Carbonation, Chloride ingress, Corrosion, Alkali aggregate reaction, Sulphate attack Acid attack, temperature and their causes, Mechanism, Effect, preventive measures. - Cracks: Cracks in concrete, type, pattern, quantification, measurement & preventive measures.

 

UNIT- II

Non Destructive Testing- Non-destructive test methods for concrete including Rebound hammer, Ultrasonic pulse velocity, Rebar locator, Corrosion meter, Penetration resistance and Pull out test, Core cutting- Corrosion: Methods for corrosion measurement and assessment including half-cell potential and resistivity, Mapping of data.

 

 

 

UNIT-III

Failure of buildings: Definition of building failure-types of failures- Causes of Failures- Faulty Design, Accidental over Loading, Poor quality of material and Poor Construction practices- Fire damage - Methodology for investigation of failures-diagnostic testing methods and equipments-repair of cracks in concrete

 

UNIT-IV

Materials for repair and rehabilitation -Admixtures- types of admixtures- purposes of using admixtures- chemical composition- Natural admixtures- Fibres- wraps- Glass and Carbon fibre wraps- Steel Plates-Concrete behavior under corrosion, disintegrated mechanisms- moisture effects and thermal effects – Visual investigation- Acoustical emission methods- Corrosion activity measurement- chloride content – Depth of carbonation- Impact echo methods- Ultrasound pulse velocity methods- Pull out tests.

 

UNIT: V

Repair Techniques: Grouting, Jacketing, Shotcreting, externally bonded plates, Nailing, Underpinning and under water repair; Materials, Equipments, Precautions and Processes.

 

UNIT: VI

Investigation of structures: Distress, observation and preliminary test methods. Case studies: related to rehabilitation of bridge piers, dams, canals, heritage structures, corrosion and erosion damaged structures.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Maintenance & Repair of Civil Structures’ by B.L. Gupta & Amit Gupta

  2. ‘Rehabilitation of Concrete Structures’ by B. Vidivelli, Standard Publishers

  3. ‘Concrete Bridge Practice Construction, Maintenance & Rehabilitation’ by V. K. Raina.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Concrete Structures- protection Repair and Rehabilitation’ by R. Doodge Woodson, BH Publishers


 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE804 (d) - WATER RESOURCES SYSTEM PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT


(Elective-IV)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The course is designed to

  1. introduce the concepts of system analysis in the planning, design, and operation of water resources.

  2. appreciate mathematical optimization methods and models.

  3. learn and apply basic economic analysis tools to water resources projects.

  4. understand linear, nonlinear and dynamic programming techniques and apply them to various water resources systems planning and design problems.

  5. appreciate simulation and management techniques in water resources systems.


 

Course Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to

  1. apply optimization methods to solve problems related to water resource systems.

  2. perform basic economic analysis to evaluate the economic feasibility of water resources projects

  3. formulate optimization models for decision making in water resources systems.

  4. use simulation models for planning and design of Water Resources Systems.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I

Introduction: Concepts of systems analysis, definition, systems approach to water resources planning and management, role of optimization models, objective function and constraints, types of optimization techniques.

 

UNIT – II

Linear programming: Formulation of linear programming models, graphical method, simplex method, application of linear programming in water resources, revised simplex method, duality in linear programming, sensitivity analysis.

UNIT – III

Dynamic programming: Principles of optimality, forward and backward recursive dynamic programming, curse of dimensionality, application for resource allocation.

 

UNIT – VI

Non-linear optimization techniques: Classical optimization techniques, Lagrange methods, Kuhn-Tucker conditions, Search techniques, overview of Genetic Algorithm

 

UNIT – V

Water Resources Economics: Basics of engineering economics, economic analysis, conditions of project optimality, benefit and cost analysis

 

UNIT – VI

Simulation and management: Application of simulation techniques in water resources, planning of reservoir system, optimal operation of single reservoir system, allocation of water resources, optimal cropping pattern, conjunctive use of surface and sub-surface water resources.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Water Resources System Analysis’ by Vedula S and P P Mujumdar, McGraw Hill Company Ltd, 2005.

  2. ‘Water Resources Economics’ by James D and R. Lee, Oxford Publishers, 2005.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Water Resources Systems Planning and Management - An Introduction to Methods, Models and Applications’ by Loucks D P and E V Bee, UNESCO Publications, 2005 (http://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/2804/21/00_intro.pdf)

  2. ‘Optimal design of water distribution networks’ by Bhave, P. R, Narosa Publishing house, 2003.


***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE804 (e) - URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING


(Elective-IV)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. To learn various procedures for travel demand estimation

  2. To various data collection techniques for OD data.

  3. To know various models and techniques for trip generation, trip distribution, mode choice and traffic assignment.

  4. To develop alternative urban transport network plans


 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of course, Student can

  1. Estimate travel demand for an urban area

  2. Plan the transportation network for a city

  3. Identify the corridor and plan for providing good transportation facilities.

  4. Evaluate various alternative transportation proposals


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT -I

Urban Transportation Problems & Travel Demand: Urban Issues, Travel Characteristics, Evolution of Planning Process, Supply and Demand – Systems approach; Trends, Overall Planning process, Long term Vs Short term planning, Demand Function, Independent Variables, Travel Attributes, Assumptions in Demand Estimation, Sequential, and Simultaneous Approaches, Aggregate and Disaggregate Techniques.

UNIT -II

Data Collection And Inventories: Collection of data – Organisation of surveys and Analysis, Study Area, Zoning, Types and Sources of Data, Road Side Interviews, Home Interview Surveys, Commercial Vehicle Surveys, Sampling Techniques, Expansion Factors, Accuracy Checks, Use of Secondary Sources, Economic data – Income – Population – Employment – Vehicle Owner Ship.

 

UNIT -III

Trip Generation & Distribution: UTPS Approach, Trip Generation Analysis: Zonal Models, Category Analysis, Household Models, Trip Attraction models, Commercial Trip Rates; Trip Distribution: Growth Factor Methods, Gravity Models, Opportunity Models, Time Function Iteration Models.

UNIT -IV

Mode Choice Analysis: Mode Choice Behaviour, Competing Modes, Mode Split Curves, Aggregate and Disaggregate Approaches; Discrete Choice Analysis, Choice sets, Maximum Utility, Probabilistic Models: Binary Logit, Multinomial Logit Model – IIA property; Aggregation.

 

UNIT -V

Traffic Assignment: Diversion Curves; Basic Elements of Transport Networks, Coding, Route Properties, Path Building Criteria, Skimming Tree, All-or-Nothing Assignment, Capacity Restraint Techniques, Reallocation of Assigned Volumes, Equilibrium Assignment.

 

UNIT -VI

Corridor Identification, Plan Preparation & Evaluation: Master plans, Selection of Corridor, Corridor Identification, Corridor deficiency Analysis; Travel Forecasts to Evaluate Alternative Improvements, Impacts of New Development on Transportation Facilities. Pivot Point Analysis, Environmental and Energy Analysis; Case studies

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Introduction to Urban System Planning’ by Hutchinson, B.G., McGraw Hill.

  2. ‘Transportation Engineering - An Introduction’ by Khisty C.J., Prentice Hall

  3. ‘Fundamentals of Transportation Planning’ by Papacostas, Tata McGraw Hill


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Urban Transportation Planning: A decision oriented Approach’ by Mayer M and Miller E, McGraw Hill

  2. ‘Introduction to Transportation Planning’ by Bruton M.J., Hutchinson of London.

  3. ‘Metropolitan Transportation Planning’ by Dicky, J.W., Tata McGraw Hill

  4. ‘Traffic Engineering and Transportation Planning’ by Kadiyali.L.R., Khanna Publishers, New Delhi.


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UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV Year B. Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester


CE804 (f) - SAFETY ENGINEERING


(Elective-IV)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :30 Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :70 Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

Course Learning Objectives:

  1. To import concepts of safety w.r.t construction Industry

  2. To understands various hazards in construction industry and preventive measures

  3. To learn safety operation of construction machinery

  4. To learn techniques to distinguish civil structures safety

  5. To understand fire safety principles


Course Outcomes:

Students will have ability to

  1. Develop management plans to prevent accidents in construction industry.

  2. Prepare plans to safe guard workers in construction of high risk buildings

  3. Ensure safety while operating construction machinery

  4. Outline safety plans for demolition of buildings

  5. Prepare fire safety plans for a given building


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Accidents Causes And Management Systems : Problems impeding safety in construction industry- causes of fatal accidents, types and causes of accidents related to various construction activities, human factors associated with these accident – construction regulations, contractual clauses – Pre contract activates, preconstruction meeting - design aids for safe construction – permits to work – quality assurance in construction - compensation – Recording of accidents and safety measures – Education and training

 

UNIT-II

Hazards Of Construction And Prevention : Excavations, basement and wide excavation, trenches, shafts – scaffolding , types, causes of accidents, scaffold inspection checklist – false work – erection of structural frame work, dismantling – tunneling – blasting, pre blast and post blast inspection – confined spaces – working on contaminated sites – work over water - road works – power plant constructions – construction of high rise buildings.

 

UNIT-III

Working At Heights: Fall protection in construction OSHA 3146 – OSHA requirement for working at heights, Safe access and egress – safe use of ladders- Scaffoldings , requirement for safe work platforms, stairways, gangways and ramps – fall prevention and fall protection , safety belts, safety nets, fall arrestors, controlled access zones, safety monitoring systems – working on fragile roofs, work permit systems, height pass – accident case studies.

 

UNIT-IV

Construction Machinery : Selection, operation, inspection and testing of hoisting cranes, mobile cranes, tower cranes, crane inspection checklist - builder’s hoist, winches, chain pulley blocks – use of conveyors - concrete mixers, concrete vibrators – safety in earth moving equipment, excavators, dozers, loaders, dumpers, motor grader, concrete pumps, welding machines, use of portable electrical tools, drills, grinding tools, manual handling scaffolding, hoisting cranes – use of conveyors and mobile cranes – manual handling.

 

 

 

UNIT-V

Safety In Demolition Work : Safety in demolition work, manual, mechanical, using explosive - keys to safe demolition, pre survey inspection, method statement, site supervision, safe clearance zone, health hazards from demolition - Indian standard - trusses, girders and beams – first aid – fire hazards and preventing methods – interesting experiences at the construction site against the fire accidents.

 

UNIT-VI

Fire Safety: Fire –fire load-control and institutional fire protection systems, Fire Hydrant and extinguishers, Electrical Hazards, protection and interlock-Discharge rod and earthling device, safety in the use of portable tools. Emergency planning and preparedness. Marking of Route Fire Exist.

 

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ‘Safety in the Build Environment’ by Jnathea D.Sime, London, 1988.



  1. ‘Reliability Maintenance and Safety Engineering, by Gupta A K, Laxmi  Publications, New Delhi.

  2. ‘Safety Management’ by John V. Grimoldi, AITBS Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi.


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Construction hazard and Safety Hand book’ by Hudson, R., Butter Worth’s, 1985.

  2. ‘Construction Safety Hand Book’ by V.J.Davies and K.Thomasin, Thomas Telford Ltd., London, 1990.

  3. ‘Handbook of OSHA Construction Safety and Health’ by Charles D. Reese & James V. Edison


 

 

***

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV B.Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester

CE804 (g) - BRIDGE ENGINEERING


(Elective-IV)





















Lecture :3 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :30 Marks
Tutorial :1 Hrs/WeekSemester End Examination :70 Marks
Practical :--Credits :3

 

Course Learning Objectives:

The objective of this course is:

  1. Familiarize Students with different types of Bridges and IRC standards

  2. Equip student with concepts and design of Slab Bridges, T Beam Bridges, Box Culverts

  3. Understand concepts of design of Plate Girder Bridges

  4. Familiarize with different methods of inspection of bridges and maintenance


 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course the student will be able to

  1. Explain different types of Bridges with diagrams and Loading standards

  2. Carryout analysis and design of Slab bridges, T Beam bridges, Box culvers and suggest structural detailing

  3. Carryout analysis and design of Plate girder bridges

  4. Organize for attending inspections and maintenance of bridges and prepare reports.


 

SYLLABUS:

UNIT-I

Introduction- Bridges- Types- Slab bridges, T Beam, Arch bridges, Cable Stayed bridges, prestressed concrete bridges, Truss Bridges, Culverts, - Nomenclature- Selection of Bridge Site- Economical span- Abutments pier and end connections- types of foundations- Open, Pile, Well Foundations, Bearings – Types- Introduction to Loading standards- Railway and IRC Loading

 

UNIT-II

Slab bridges- Wheel load on slab- effective width method- slabs supported on two edges- cantilever slabs- dispersion length- Design of interior panel of slab- Guyon’s – Massonet Method –Hendry- Jaegar Methods- Courbon’s theory- Pigeaud’s method

 

 

 

UNIT-III

T-Beam bridges- Analysis and design of various elements of bridge –Design of deck slab, Longitudinal girders, Secondary beams- Reinforcement detailing

 

UNIT-IV

Plate Girder Bridges: Elements of plate girder and their design-web- flange- intermediate stiffener- vertical stiffeners- bearing stiffener- Splices, Design problem with detailing

 

UNIT-V

Box Culverts: Loading – Analysis and Design- Reinforcement detailing.

 

UNIT-VI

Inspection and Maintenance of Bridges: Procedures and methods for inspection – Testing of bridges- Maintenance of Sub Structures and Superstructures- Maintenance of bearings- Maintenance Schedules

 

TEXT BOOK

  1. ‘Essentials of Bridge Engineering’ by Jhonson Victor D

  2. ‘Design of Bridge Structures’ by T. R. Jagadeesh, M.A. Jayaram, PHI

  3. ‘Design of RC Structures’ by B. C. Punmai, Jain & Jain, Lakshmi Publications


 

REFERENCES:

  1. ‘Design of Concrete Bridges’ by Aswini, Vazirani, Ratwani

  2. ‘Design of Steel Structures’ by B. C. Punmai, Jain & Jain, Lakshmi Publications

  3. ‘Design of Bridges’ by Krishna Raju


 

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UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING KAKINADA

IV B.Tech- Civil Engineering- II semester

CE805- PROJECT WORK


 





















Contact Hours :9 hrs/WeekInternal Assessment :60 Marks
Tutorial :---Semester End Examination :140 Marks
Practical :---Credits :9

 

The main objective of the Project work is

 

  1. To enable the student apply engineering knowledge that has been taught all through the programme for solving practical engineering problem.

  2. To enable the student capable for prblem solving / problem shooting.

  3. To instill and inculcate team spirit/ team work in to the minds of the students.

  4. To enable/ train the students  report making/ documnetation.

  5. To provide students an opportunity to use  any civil   engineering software for their project work.


 

Out comes of the Project work.

 

Up on completion of the Project work, the student will be able to

  1. Apply all levels of Engineering knowledge in solving the Engineering problems.

  2. Work together with team spirit.

  3. Use Civil Engineering software at least one.

  4. Document the projects.


 

 

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